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Faculty

Rudyard J. Alcocer

Associate Professor
Forrest and Patsy Shumway Chair of Excellence in Romance Languages
616 McClung Tower

Phone: (865) 974-6996
E-Mail: ralcocer@utk.edu


Rudyard Alcocer is the Forrest and Patsy Shumway Chair of Excellence in Romance Languages and Associate Professor of Latin American literature and culture in the Department of Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He earned his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Iowa and his B.A. (Magna cum laude) in Philosophy from Emory University.

He is the author of Time Travel in the Latin American & Caribbean Imagination: Re-reading History (Palgrave Macmillan 2011), Narrative Mutations: Discourses of Heredity and Caribbean Literature (Routledge 2005), and several essays on Latin American and Caribbean literature and culture. He is currently working on a book-length project that explores experimental approaches to literary texts.

Dr. Alcocer teaches all levels of Spanish language and Latin American literature and culture, and has designed and taught advanced courses involving the Hispanic Caribbean and the African Diaspora in Spanish America. He enjoys reading in a variety of subject matters, including literature, history, philosophy, psychology, science, and many others.

Additional information about Dr. Alcocer is available at http://rudyardalcocer.wordpress.com

  • Ph.D., University of Iowa

Books:

  • Time Travel in the Latin American & Caribbean Imagination: Re-reading History. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
  • Narrative Mutations: Discourses of Heredity and Caribbean Literature. New York and London: Routledge, 2005.

Essays:

  • "Three Burials, Two Countries, One Destiny: Borders and Visual Meaning in The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada." Ometeca 18.1, March 2013; pp. 90-105.
  • "From Amerindian to Slave to 'True' Caribbean: The Ten Incarnations of Adam Avatar and the End of Ethnicity in the Caribbean." Caribbean Vistas: Critiques of Caribbean Arts and Cultures. Fall 2012; Vol. 1:1.
  • "The Ghosts of La Malinche: Trees and Treason in Gioconda Belli's La mujer habitada."  ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment (Oxford UP). Print: Autumn 2010; Vol 17.4 pp. 735-753. Online: doi: 10.1093/isle/isq118 (November 2010); pp. 1-19. (Reprint:"The Ghosts of La Malinche)): Contemporary Literary Criticism: Criticism of the Works of Today's Novelists, Poets, Playwrights, Short-Story Writers, Scriptwriters, and Other Creative Writers. Vol 359. New York: Gale Cengage Learning, 2014; pp. 63-72.
  • "Leyendo Reyita en Atlanta." Proceedings of the XI Conferencia Internacional de Cultura Africana y Afroamericana., April 12-16, 2010. Ed. Marta Cordies-Jackson. CD-ROM. Santiago de Cuba, 2010.
  • "Word vs. Image in Afro-Hispanic Pedagogy." PALARA (Publication of the Afro-Latin/American Research Association, Dartmouth College). Fall 2009; Vol 13, pp. 63-74.
  • "Going in Circles: Spanish American Identity and the Circular Motif in Nicolás Echevarría's Cabeza de Vaca." Literature/Film Quarterly. October 2008; Vol. 36:4, 250-58.
  • "Along the Banks of the Amazon: Ethnicity and the Image in Jules Verne's La Jangada." AmeriQuests (Vanderbilt University) 2008; (5) 1, pp. 1-20.
  •  "The Ties that Bind? Rhythm, Writing, and the Question of Genetics in the Caribbean."  Music, Literature, and Cultural Unity in the Caribbean (Africa World Press), edited by Timothy J. Reiss. January 2005, pp. 91-110.

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